Tag Archive | landscape

York Open Studios – nearly ready.

3 days and counting!  Time is galloping.

logosecret tree textiles (2)

April 6th & 7th, and 13th & 14th,  10-5pm. 

All are welcome to come and visit artists and makers of all descriptions in their own spaces. Come and see what is happening and where, it is amazing what secrets can  lie behind the most ordinary front doors.  Grab a free brochure/guide from  a  local library, shop, pub , cafe, or go on line to yorkopenstudios.co.uk to get a list, pretty pics and maps and just roll up! We would love to meet you.

My  venue is no.96 and my workroom is still just that – a room for working in. I have been clearing out all the things that have crept in  from the storeroom and have firmly taken them back upstairs. The workroom door is off again – this is the point of no return.

This year the work is in a series of series, all inter related but also distinct. It will make displaying them all quite a challenge in what is a modestly sized room.  There is a lot more small things, more 3D things and then the ginormous painted scarves.  It will be an interesting week. And don’t forget the eternal tidying up.

This is the current state  I was going to leave the hang until Thursday, so began it on Tuesday. So of course it went ‘hammer hammer hammer,  mutter  mutter mutter, oops’ as I had to keep stopping to move things, complete some framing, trip over some bits that are awaiting relocation, fill in holes in the wall and find the matching paint.  But as you can see most of the chaos is being resolved, the work is up apart from one or two pieces -one is currently hiding, at over a metre tall it can’t hide for long, and the other hasn’t been released from exhibition yet.

I have barely scratched my to do lists –  I think I need a new approach to list making, but have bought cable ties to put up the signage and a supply of biscuits.  This blog was on Sunday’s list, the draft was done but only remembered it today – and rewrote most of it anyway! There is still much to do, the scarves need to find a home, labels etc, setting up the standing landscapes, reorganising the furniture and so on. But it will be ready on Saturday to welcome people into and hopefully share my enthusiasm for textiles and making.    Must remember to remove that post-it note. But on a happier note, every time I think about mowing the lawn or cleaning the windows, it rains. Must have been good in a previous life.

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landscape books

This is an extension from the standing landscapes. It is a combination of old trends and fascinations and new materials and priorities.

Fun!

Fascination list 1.

Folding. Inside/outside. Angles/ curves. 2D into 3D. Front and back.  Out comes that can be changed rather than rigid. Perspectives. Mark making, textures, simplicity of line. Rhythm. Less not more. The seen and the understood . Denying  the sanctity of vision. Enclosing, revealing. Communication. Enigma. Questions. Narratives.

Oh dear – how many contradictions!

The standing landscapes addressed many of these areas.  But I am going further – or at least trying to….  Communication and narritives – tehse already speak of visual things, of space and textures, lines and perspectives – all physical things, all expressive but have underlying rules and conventions. I wish to introduce some of the deeep and wonderful thinking that happens as I move through the landscape. For me they are entwined into the physical. The obvious is to write – a familiar route. Underlying or overlaying? Woven in ?  to be read or just hint? With or across the lines of the landscape?

Giving the folding a purpose – making a pull out book. Having a cover and the landscape folded within. This seems a very York thing. Driving around the city I see distant hills in 3 directions,  blue and purple horizons, or gleaming in the sunlight, once I get to them they unfold into complexity and character, opening up their secrets and corners.

Proto Landscape Book 1

Construction-  Samples,  vilene panels cut and fused onto muslin to act as hinges. The tall narrow strip will be the spine,  the ones either side will be the covers. The last is of the final blank ‘book’ , stitched around to seal the muslin to the vilene.  The scale is too small for anything other than the briefest experiments.

 Nothing over special about the image – do like the layers in the foreground but the covers are where the interest lies, should maybe have a greater disction between cover and extension – colour? content?  density?

There is no writing on it yet –  that is next. Down the spine like a title? following the perspective lines? in the pale, in the dark or in a slight neutral? 10 minutes later and there is writing! As if by magic! or sewing machine…

The text is one I have used before, and always reminds me of leisurely walking through the Yorkshire Wolds on a bright and breezy day. It  is whimsical rather than deep,  it comes from watching the wind ripple through ripe barley as the clouds scud about above them.

Problem – front and back – writing has a right and wong way round.  Very much a problem on the front cover, so the text has to start only on the inside panels. Should I be colouring the cover? Thread or paint?  I shall try paint……

Who am I kidding? Is this a way to avoid thinking about York Open Studios?  April 6th is just how many days away?? Please do come and see me if you can –  I promise to have tidied up by then…..

Oh Happy Sprout!

Done. DONE!  Sprouting is over.  Well the ‘fun’ bits are.  There is only more pressing, quilting , backing, binding and hanging to do.  Seeing as I was teaching and working in a shop that sells quilting supplies, it was amazing how completely I forgot to get some wadding to quilt it with. This level of idiocy takes some serious talent, and lots of practice.img_20190201_095330706

I have stretched it but as it hung  afterwards the distortion caused by the stitching has come back.  May be some more stabiliser? but I would rather it hung easily,without tensions.  No, acknowledge the fault and use,  do not try to hide. Perfection would be a bore, and if I don’t have something to angst over then I might feel the need to do some housework.

Things I would change – the height of the back hill – don’t think I have tied the left  treeline to the rest of the image effectively enough and the curve makes it look like an eyebrow. I wouldn’t mind a touch more of something in the deadzone that is the middle ground. More tone in the green? At least the old boiled sprout colour has become less dominant. I do like it as a colour but not in wholesale quantities.  At the very least this piece has gobbled up a vast amount of thread – well over a kilometre I guess. I now need to go on a major foraging mission – I think I am going to shift more towards Madeira threads- their base is just half an hour away and round the corner is the source of sublime  bacon sandwiches!  Always a silver lining.20190130_152818-collage Its next public appearance should be in April for the York Open Studios – the invitation is there- come and see the Sprout (properly named by then!) in its native habitat – I am nmber 96.

The Most Difficult bit…. and workshop call

I am an experienced and  effective tutor of art and textiles as well as exhibiting artist. I am.  I have spaces in  Wednesday evening and  Friday morning  classes –  all levels and stages of experience and aspiration are welcome to come to play and enjoy creative textiles. Please contact either through email (on right) or the comments if interested. There will be coffee and tea, but I have already eaten the biscuit stash, (marketing not a strong point).   I thought I would get this out of the way before anyone reads the rest of it……

 

Well the Fairly Large Beastie with Sprouts  is steaming along,  nearly all of the base sewing is done and some places have multiple layers of work on them. This is where it gets difficult – there is a huge investment of time and effort in there and it is going from the experimental building phase to the consolidation phase.  Now I have to weld it all together, make those early decisions good and work upon the thing as a whole.

The stitching on the hills is the point of no return – so far a light varigated and a dull mid blue on the far left slopes. Still don’t like it – too flat and contrived. The treeline has  more stitch in it, working in blocks of hatching like the original sketch – might leave the trees behind as they are – very crude and sketchy.

The right is better – closer to the experimental rough work – but I still have to be brave and commit to working on the road way.  There are just too many niggly decisions attached to all the areas.  What I want is to  take alot of that green paint out – it flattens and homogenises now that I’m trying for subtle.

IMG_20190120_095817707

I may be drastic, it may be bold, or it may be stupid: tell you afterwards.  The inking option is about to be realised. This is a bit derring do – sink or swim- in my best tradition.

 

Always was going to play with wet colour  in the top half – blooms and runs of  ink/stain washed and scrubbed into the fabric. Its time has come – the stark flatness of the calico is distracting  and killing the subtle stitching done in the tree line.     Will this be tightly controlled and considered? Of course not, what a daft question. It is going to be -do it and pray, then do some more, have a coffee, start thinking about bleach, rinse off in the shower and worry about the how and where of drying later.   It is a cold, dank and damp day so not happening outside – this will be attacked  flat on the biggest table and apologise to the carpet afterwards ( I think of the splashes and drips as honourable  battle scars).    I just hope I  have some inky stuff hiding upstairs. Should press it and de-whisker it first. Why is everything so complicated?

Probably not my brightest  idea.  Definitely not, but I can not bear working on something that is going flat and predictable on me. Deciding not to use big, blank spaces in the composition – which twit advised that?  Umm, me.

Please do not call round today – it may be dangerous.

Oops.

Happy Christmas

middlesbhut I have definitely survived the Mid-winter Hut in the Middle of Middlesborough  experience but it has taken quite a while to organise the house back to some semblence of order.  Now most things are sorted – all now have some where to go and somewhere for me look when I can’t find them.

It was good to  see a selection of old and new work together, to see the constant and also progressive elements, and to see how a new audience respond. They were not looking for art, not looking for textiles, I was in their patch rather than them coming into mine, and the response was either blank, disbelief or real enthusiasm, one guy went and fetched his friends and then his family to have a look! (Didn’t buy anything though,  still waiting for my millionaire to roll up).  Can’t really compete with the Reindeer Parade or hot street food.

So I have put all of this year’s efforts up at home, just to see where I have got to,  and…. it doesn’t fit. I need a bigger wall, in fact 2 bigger walls. The snapshots do not include the larger pieces or the last winter walks offering.   Very surprised. Rather smug.  Bit confused. My perception of  the last months seems askew, the pictorial is as strong as the abstract.  Some of the tangents  do seem less tangenty.  Since I stopped doing the pure  process based things  the 2 extremes are working together, a bit forced in the hybrid pieces but more comfortably in the newer bits – like the Winter Walks.  And as for the basics – use of stitch, use of colour and surface , they are dotting about all over the place.  Perhaps  the separation was a good thing, it let the ideas about how I should work get tested out and now I am reverting more to how it is natural for me to work without over thinking.fBrammerWinterWalk

One thing is certain, this is a cyclic trend. I have to test, to try, to ask. And don’t always see the answers immediately.  Above is Winter Walks, I think it is finished now, even quilted it a little. It has come quite a long way from the mangled thing shown last post. Next post I think should be his life history.

Think is definitely time for Christmas. Hope you all have a thoroughly enjoyable festive season and  recover quickly from the New Year celebrations.

ps new workshops are listed on my website and the frantextiles facebook page, plus some sale items.

Fractured

I set myself a task of reworking ( repurposing?)  an experimental piece I found lurking in the deepest, darkest cupboard. It must be at least  be of an age to be taking exams and leaving school for an exciting future – well, it got me and my rotary cutter.

Carrying on with this compromised landscape theme of imposed divisions, patterns and shapes being distorted by having to fit onto an imperfect surface, it seemed appropriate to play over the top of this discarded piece.

It was sliced and diced totally arbitrarily into 3″ish pieces and patterns and lines from the current sketchbook worked over the top.  The images are from Great Fryupdale and Rosedale on the North York Moors.(and yes, they are real names).P1180246  The level of  aesthetic consideration and planning was kept to a minimum – after all most landscapes are the result of practical and  pragmatic  decisions.  Some I think have worked well – they retain an element of landscape, others are more abstract, some have all the charm of  the Vale of York on a cold and soggy  Sunday. At this scale the stitching often feels crude and working over the mixed layers  of flimsy synthetic sheers and net  was a bit of a nightmare – no wonder I shifted onto heavier fabrics.

These are going to be presented as greeting  cards rather than get reassembled, so may achieve that exciting future after all, as they spread far and wide.

Please check the workshops page or website for the next classes – the next, Colour, is fully booked but there are spaces after that.

Do make a space in your diary for the York Textile Artists exhibition  in November, and I have taken an opportunity to stand in a hut in the middle of Middlesborough 2 Sundays in December  selling my wares, so please come along if you can.

nose and grindstone.

Thank goodness that is the end of June. Far too much going on.  July looks like a just getting on month…  fewer workshops and classes, and major deadlines looming.

I have proposed the evolving landscapes and the Falling Light series for Knaresborough, they are now at the framers, but still want to make more. I am applying for the Great North Art Show again, that will be the Written Wolds series – I want to re frame one or two of those but haven’t decided how exactly, what ever it will be mega bucks.  Also got the Staithes Festival at the same time – hmm……

So, just got myself a little bit of stitching to do.

Can you tell what it is yet? P1070174 I went back to an older technique with the  hand understitching  (Roger Federer was playing at Wimbledon). It gives a structure, some bulk, a bit of texture and colour to work on. The flatness of fabric can be just too flat some days.  This was from a 5 minute pen scribble P1070179sketch – took an awful lot

fBrammer

longer to stitch.  Not yet entirely sure it is done –  the  machine stitching has lost the energy and directness – might be the addition of colour and a bit of the tonal range. There are lots of tweaks to do now I look, – the right side of the tree does look a bit too Harmony hairspray, the path is too stark, could do with a dull tone in the distance. Maybe a leaf layer in the foreground in a contrast green? Just in line to keep that Summer undergrowth jungle theme going. The tree trunks to the left have disappeared – subtle I wanted, not invisible.

May be try a more monochrome one over understitching?

 

And as for the last landscape stone – mounted onto some more fine cotton, glued to make rigid, painted and stitched…. the frame is temporary.

fBrammer (2)