Tag Archive | textiles

Observations from the House of Brammer.

Truths about my textile art:

You will be inspired by a view from the most inaccessible plaHorsedale,Huggatece or at the top of the highest hill. There will always be a sheep there. Or nosey cows.

 

What looks good in paint or pencil doesn’t work in the same way in thread. Guessing how it will work is pointless, it will tell you it its own time.

 

When ever you find the perfect base fabric at a fabulous price, the supplier goes bust, emigrates, goes on a Buddhist retreat.

You will never have exactly the right colour,P1170407

weight or type of thread. Doesn’t matter what you buy, the one you put back was the right one.

 

You will always run out of the perfect thread just moments before completing. Usually just as the local supplier has closed for the day.

It is your needle’s mission in life to break.

Being the last viable needle in your possession is too much pressure. It will break, again just as the shop closes.

Mess with the bobbin tension gods at your peril. They will always seek retribution.

If using a hoop the bit you want to sew next will be under the frame.P1060885

If using an air pen to mark the fabric it will fade away before you finish stitching.

 

If it all goes well, it will look awful. Every piece needs an argument.

 

If the room is tidy when you finished, the work wasn’t worth it.

Count the coffee breaks rather than the hours.

The tighter the deadline the more intriguing whatever is happening outside the window.

 

The gallery/exhibition always wants the piece you have just sold.

The framing is always wrong. Or the fittings, or the label.

P1170426The photos you have are always the wrong size or resolution.

If rushing to get an on line submission together, that is when the auto updates kidnap your computer and it configures for ever, and then scrambles up the internet connection.

Facebook is a black hole for time and sanity.

If accepted for 2 exhibitions that overlap, they will want exactly the same pieces to show.

Only the pieces you never want to see again are praised, only the ones you secretly want back are sold.

And, of course, the back will look better than the front!big beastie crop

Lustre Saga Concludes.

Short version –  not sure.

Longer version – umm

Not even sure I got that the right way round.freehnd machine work

Test piece –  not complete but enough done to show –  The shadows are polyester and cotton threads. There is a depth and richness to The canopy I under sewed in yellow to lift the finer thread but this  area and grass are mostly  40wt rayons over silk fabrics. . Do  you notice the difference?  Annoyed at the grass – but will show on a close up.

 

 

sunlight garden test detaill 1

Spot the bright green to the left of the tree trunk? That colour is all the way through the grass area. In the horizontal it just does not show!  This could a major pain – I rely on directional stitching to give definition and form. These horizontal rows  I did with the normal machine settings – and it did not like it. The top tension ended up looser than when I drop the feed dogs, actually had to re-tighten for scribbling in the grass at the base of the trunk. You can see tiny pinpricks of dark across all the grass, that is the bobbinfil pulled up from below. Nice visual texture – would have preferred to plan it.detail from test piece

The canopy to the shadow is a better contrast, although the shiniest bits are the fibres from the  silk  scraps underneath!  Does work well against the 30wt variegated cotton used on the trunk.

General conclusion – not life changing but nice enough.  Will I buy more?  As a treat, and use as a top dressing over other threads/textures. Still haven’t forgiven them for the incredible vanishing colour trick.   “Why don’t you just turn it round?” said an ex-friend –  if  my lawn was vertical there would be even less chance of me mowing it!

Life beyond The Lustre Saga has continued –  These are happy few about to be launched upon the unsuspecting world next week in Knaresborough. All just about this year’s vintage-  the dancing trees is a revision with violence , but I see a shift towards colour and  now pattern is happening.  Not exactly subtle.  I blame purple.P1170426

Also check out the website  if you fancy owning a piece of this insanity – I have just put a load  ( 5 or 6!) of samples and small  test bits on the sales page.

Yorkshire Wolds-

After all the intense woodland work I felt the need for horizons, to be in amongst landforms and feel the effort and stretch of moving through it. At the root of this is the simple fact that I like lumpy and bumpy country.

 

The Wolds are chalkland rather than limestone country like the Dales, so they have their own character. The flat land seems to be the hill top not the valley bottom,  smooth, steep hillsides and oddly, more Highland cattle than sheep along the route I took.  After a morning of wandering and looking an idea was formulating. This is ‘smaller’ then the Dales, and I kept seeing pattern in the arable crops, the movement of wind through the crops, the networks of field margins, paths, stands of trees. I tried my best to ignore the infestations of the Greater Lycra Cyclist in full summer garb.

Huggate, Yorkshire Wolds.

Huggate. Collages of plucked and stitched fabrics – mostly silks. The exposed oil painting seems to blend in well.

This has emerged initially as a patterned landscape over an oil painting –  still not sure about that dark red. I think it is a bit on the busy side but has a sunlit quality that I like – the contrasts are in brightness and colour rather than just tonal value. I will get it famed up this week then it is ready to go.

It has spawned a little gaggle of mini  ones  as I played with pattern and  shapes. Still want to be bolder and less fussy with this but keep losing sight of what I am aiming for and get side tracked by the fun details.  Just to keep things interesting I am trying two versions of the same view side by side to see if I can separate the safer responses on to one and the dodgier responses onto the other. I fear insanity.

I have added July workshops and dates for exhibitions over the Summer to the Me page- or just check the frantextiles  facebook page.

 

The new Silver Birch

hThis is sat stillish at the moment – sorting out the nature of the background. Will prob go with the washed blue uneven dyed with texture.  The sample piece was the scrap used to wipe the surfaces clean after post-microwave ( oh it’s hot!!!!) minor spillage.  So currently diluting and re-dying with a touch more sky blue in the mix. And remembering that PING means hot. This has been quick to come together and simple to do, but of course I didn’t really enjoy it. It became mechanical, and the physical separation of the layers meant less experimentation and arguing with colours. A little tweaking and balancing was possible after washing out and more will happen as it is compiled but if too much is added then what was the point of the separate layers?

In the interim this has been happening – imaginatively known as The New Silver Birch for the moment.    Early progress was quick, now working harder but  progress is only at breakneck tortoise pace. At the really slow and annoyingly intense stage – will be at this for a few more days yet.

Quick sketches- just to get started with – intend to keep returning to refresh the ideas each time gathering more and specific info. Unless it rains.

First layers – rich blue base colour and first stitch and fray to establish the central tree. Then building up the trees to the left, patterned silk for the lower and then mix of sheer and tufty silk pieces for the foliage. The pics show it as the fabric layers are built on.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

When I woke this morning the stitchy fairies had not arrived, so had to stitch again today. Below is today’s effort – working on the left section, fraying and stitching, and then beginning the foreground.

A good idea, looks good, but so time consuming. There is a coloured base then  thin silk which is loosely stitched, and then the bulk of the silk is pulled away.( Repeat. Sore fingers from some serious tweezering.)  Love the ghost patterns and textures but the surface is very soft so a lot of sewing to moan about is required.  At least now I can get a feel for the whole composition, it will continue to change as stronger colours are added and shapes and textures defined – maybe another week? Month. Lifetime?

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Close ups of the stitching,  just because,- crude, long, mostly straight. Just getting the fabrics and composition sorted ready for the finer top working.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Will be putting July and August Workshops on the Me page here and on the facebook page in the next week. Only planning a few over the Summer, so…..

 

Back to the Woods

Weellll…..    the new creative burst began with an encounter with curious bullocks, dragonflies, two hares and a crazed cyclist ( his lycra must have been too tight).

At this time of year I like being up and doing early. I think my neighbour would object to sewing machines  before 6 am so I am going out sketching instead- just collecting ideas and options, (this did lead to the bullock encounter). P1060814

This morning was in the local woods and it was the little places, the ordinary ones that caught my imagination.  This was a simple view at the edge of the wood, the sun catching the birch tree on the fringe and it was glowing with light seen through the trunks and delicate foliage of the wood proper. A very quiet beauty. No great drama of composition or texture, or even colour, but…..  The sketch is crude and under developed but that view and idea was the one I thought about on the way home.

It is now beginning in stitch. To be honest it is at the questioning phase, so looks like nothing. Hopefully the questions will lead to answers and the whole may be resolved but it will take time.

P1060806Layer 1 the birch – worked on water soluble fabric.  When washed away the black lines  should also go leaving a lacy  web.  I quite fancy manipulating this to create differing densities and concentrations of colour and textures, so the overall shape may change. And it may need some blue for shadows. And….

 

 

 

 

Layer 2 – mid ground – tree trunks. The purple pen is air erasable so should have faded by morning. Used a heavier thread, and for the top set of branches worked over crewel wool to give it more body.

And then decided to add on foliage. This was delicate and almost silhouetted, so the first pass was a dark teal stitched in a stop start pattern. Added in purple for more density, then dark red for dark contrast, bright jade for light and a mid blue to fill in the holes. So the planned 3hrs sewing turned into 5. (Sorry hedge, may be we will get together with the trimmers tomorrow) And this is how is staying for the moment. At least until  tomorrow morning.P1060812

Questions –  What will happen when the fabric is washed out.   I am imagining adding a stitched layer to each of the floating layers as they are fixed down, or perhaps not. It will depend on how they wash out.   Also may need to add more colour  in each layer – again won’t know until the soluble is washed out.  Is there enough for the idea to work?  It may get washed out and then put straight back on another piece for more content to be added.

Do I put it on  a neutral background? or a colour or a worked ground? Or none at all?

And the foreground – how much/ how little? Inclination is to go very dark for strong contrast, but……   I don’t even know if the composition is going to work – will it have that little bit of magic that I saw?

Oh well. I will find out tomorrow, you may have to wait until next week.

“I Want to be a Tree!”

I have started doing classes on Sundays –  and with working and doing courses at the Viking Loom on Saturdays, this means  my weekends are now harder work than my week!  Have survived and had a good day today doing trees.

I quite like trees, you might have noticed. Todays venture was titled “I  Want to be a Tree”.  They are a fabulous vehicle for teaching this form of freehand sewing. Lots of potential for experimentation with technique, style, texture and colour.  I totally enjoyed myself.  I have polished off the afternoon watching the men’s final  tennis from Paris, and writing the blog, slowly, is the next way of avoiding going out to mow the lawn.

 

P1170288

A matter of moments to gather examples, samples and original artwork!

 

With a wall full of tree-ness we spent the day sketching from sources,  refining approaches and exploring processes.

P1170284

This one is just short of being finished – a bit more working into the foliage and the trunk filled in and it should be done.

And as for this one…P1170285

June and July I have set aside and making and doing time. Lots of getting out and thinking so approaches and expectations.

But first must mow the lawn……

Northern College of Costume Exhibition

ncc flyerThink you are not interested? markterry_170509_8660cropThe latest group are putting their efforts on display this weekend and it is worth taking a look.

markterry_170509_8459crop

This is good old fashioned history based theatrical costume making.

Never wondered how many component parts go into making one Tudor “dress”?  Well, now is the time to start wondering and also have the opportunity to find out.  At the same time you could take a peek inside  a Teddy Boy’s pockets, or ask the ladies about their 1940/50s evening wear.

markterry_170509_8814crop

I went along as a dresser for the Tudor photoshoot in our local Tudor Barley Hall. Those big skirts over farthingales and the stays can take quite a lot  effort to get on and then to manage. It was so atmospheric in there – I can’t wait to see the photos.

The Teddy Boys stayed in the city centre down one of the seediest side lanes. No romantic Tudor beams for them. The final shoot of the day was at a Neo Classical chapel. A rather busy day.

markterry_170509_8660

Take a look at the complexities of the makes, see what can be achieved with some  ingenuity, hard work  and a lot of know-how and guidance. And then think – this was all achieved in 15 weeks!

I did the course a few years ago, and survived with battered, stitched fingerends and a lot more skills than I started with.

If you are in York, do drop in.

markterry_170509_9194cropallPhotos : Mark Terry